Music book – Bit Books http://bitbooks.com/ Thu, 12 May 2022 22:19:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://bitbooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/profile-120x120.png Music book – Bit Books http://bitbooks.com/ 32 32 BC faculty members unearth and digitize 400-year-old music book https://bitbooks.com/bc-faculty-members-unearth-and-digitize-400-year-old-music-book/ Sun, 03 Apr 2022 18:52:16 +0000 https://bitbooks.com/bc-faculty-members-unearth-and-digitize-400-year-old-music-book/ A team of Boston College professors traveled to Portugal over spring break in search of a 400-year-old songbook created by an accomplished but quiet composer, according to Michael Noone. “I began to discover that she not only had a name, but that she was the most prolific printer of sacred music in all of modern […]]]>

A team of Boston College professors traveled to Portugal over spring break in search of a 400-year-old songbook created by an accomplished but quiet composer, according to Michael Noone.

“I began to discover that she not only had a name, but that she was the most prolific printer of sacred music in all of modern Spain,” said Noone, the leader of this project and president of the BC music department.

Noone said the book, which was written by Susana Muñoz, has deep roots in the Jesuit tradition, connecting it to British Columbia’s own Jesuit heritage.

“[It] is the 400th anniversary of the canonization of Saint Ignatius Loyola and Francis Xavier [last month]”, Noone said. “There [was] a special ceremony in March 400 [years] in Rome, where Saint Ignatius and Saint Francis Xavier were canonized.

Noone said he hoped to commemorate the anniversary, so he went to the Burns Library to find a book about the original ceremony that took place in 1610 for inspiration.

“I went to the Burns Library and dug up a book from 1610 that told of all the festivities that took place at a Jesuit college – the University of Salamanca – in Spain in 1610,” Noone said.

While looking at this book, Noone said he saw something that caught his eye.

“What caught my eye was the printer,” he said. “There is a 260-page description of all the performances and festivities that took place in 1610, but on the title page it says ‘by the widow of…’ and then a man’s name.”

The book only acknowledged Muñoz’s husband, dismissing Muñoz as a respectable printer because of his gender, which Noone says is indicative of historical female oppression.

“In the 17th century, women were [only] somebody’s mother, somebody’s daughter or somebody’s widow,” Noone said.

So no one wanted to know more about this woman, he said, starting with her name.

“So I went to Salamanca about two years ago,” Noone said. “I found out the woman’s name. Her name is Susana Muñoz.

Noone soon discovered that Muñoz was the most prolific printer of sacred music in early Spain. After finding a contract between her and a composer, Diego de Bruceña, Noone learned that there were copies of Muñoz’s work somewhere, he said.

“This [said] exactly how many days the printing contract was to take place, who was going to be responsible for funding the paper, ink and proofreading,” Noone said.

But even with proof that this 400-year-old musical book existed, Noone said he had no definite proof of its whereabouts, which led to its journey.

Noone said he traveled to Portugal to explore various archives, eventually discovering that the book may be in a small town called Miranda do Douro.

Matthew Naglak, digital scholarship librarian at BC and a member of Noone’s team, said the BC researchers traveled to Madrid before heading to the city, located just over the Portuguese border.

“We spent most of our time in the city museum, which housed the choir book and a bunch of other artifacts,” Naglak said.

After locating the book, Noone said his team took photos which will then be shared with the BC community. But before the photos were released, Noone said the team would finish transcribing the book.

“We will have BC students involved in virtually every stage of the project,” Noone said. “We hope to become really good [and] transcriptions available… for everyone, as well as performances there.

The team hopes to include a top-down 2D imagery model of the book on the website so people can view and possibly perform songs from the book, according to Naglak.

“We actually have a relatively new method of high [resolution] scanning based on 3D modeling of individual pages from the choir book, then taking that actual 3D surface and exporting a top-down 2D image,” Naglak said.

Naglak said the team’s photography method avoids any possible damage to the book.

“The book itself is very fragile and can’t be transported to BC and also a bit moldy and falling apart,” Naglak said. “We really wanted to try and go for a non-invasive way of scanning the text because it couldn’t fit into a standard scanner to [fear of] he is hurt more.

Although the process of digitizing the book is slow, Naglak said he enjoys traveling to a new place and using technology to connect different parts of the world.

“My background is actually in archaeology, so I like to travel and see old things from all eras,” Naglak said.

Noone said this book is incredibly important to the BC community, not only because it is rooted in Jesuit tradition, but also because of the heightened importance of sharing music after the challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We had two years without singing and two years without wind instruments. We had two years without performances,” he said. “It seems to me that it comes at the right time when you need it [the] more.”

Featured image Courtesy of Michael Noone/For the Heights


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Boston College digitizes unique music book found in Portugal https://bitbooks.com/boston-college-digitizes-unique-music-book-found-in-portugal/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 17:01:14 +0000 https://bitbooks.com/boston-college-digitizes-unique-music-book-found-in-portugal/ BOSTON — The only known surviving copy of a 400-year-old book heralded as a great treasure in the history of music in the Iberian Peninsula has been found in Portugal and is currently being digitized by Boston College. Discovered in the co-cathedral of Miranda do Douro, in the district of Bragança, in the northeast of […]]]>

BOSTON — The only known surviving copy of a 400-year-old book heralded as a great treasure in the history of music in the Iberian Peninsula has been found in Portugal and is currently being digitized by Boston College.

Discovered in the co-cathedral of Miranda do Douro, in the district of Bragança, in the northeast of Portugal, this copy of the “Book of masses, magnificas and motets” by Diego de Bruceña is one of 40 printed in 1620 by Susana Muñoz, the greatest figure of modern Spain. prolific printer of sacred music.

Dr. Michael Noone, chair of Boston College’s music department, who has studied and performed Renaissance sacred music for decades, coordinates its digitization process.

“The fortuitous survival of a printing contract in which Susana Muñoz agreed to publish a huge choir book of sacred Latin works by the composer Diego de Bruceña (d. 1622) has fascinated scholars, but to this day not one only one copy of the book had been found,” Dr Noone told O Jornal. “Of the 40 books printed in 1620 and distributed to various European cathedrals, no other copies are known to have survived. “

The only known copy of the

The book was first located in 2015 by Celina Pinto, now director of the Museu da Terra in Miranda do Douro.

“In 2016, Celina’s uncle, António Rodrigues Mourinho, published an article describing the book and calling on experts with the necessary combination of musical skills to help uncover the secrets of the book,” Dr Noone said.

This call went unanswered until about three years ago when Dr. Noone visited Miranda do Douro. His research focuses on sacred music of the modern era, with particular emphasis on Spain and Latin America.


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Bobby Gillespie Wins Best Music Book Award at BandLab NME Awards 2022 https://bitbooks.com/bobby-gillespie-wins-best-music-book-award-at-bandlab-nme-awards-2022/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 23:27:43 +0000 https://bitbooks.com/bobby-gillespie-wins-best-music-book-award-at-bandlab-nme-awards-2022/ Bobby Gillespie won Best Music Book at the 2022 BandLab NME Awards tonight (March 2) for child of the building. The Primal Scream frontman’s memoir beat Dave Grohl’s music books (The storyteller: tales of life and music), Michelle Zauner of Japanese Breakfast (Crying in H Mart), Quest love (music is history) and Paul McCartney (Words) […]]]>

Bobby Gillespie won Best Music Book at the 2022 BandLab NME Awards tonight (March 2) for child of the building.

The Primal Scream frontman’s memoir beat Dave Grohl’s music books (The storyteller: tales of life and music), Michelle Zauner of Japanese Breakfast (Crying in H Mart), Quest love (music is history) and Paul McCartney (Words) For victory.

“I am very happy and honored to receive the award for Best Music Book,” Bobby said. “Thank you NME! »

Posted on October 21 child of the building tells the story of Gillespie leading up to the creation of the classic Primal Scream album “Screamadelica”.

In 2007, Primal Scream was crowned Godlike Genius at the NME Awards. They also performed at the ceremony, joined by Mick Jones of The Clash to perform “(White Man) In Hammersmith Palais” and The View guitarist Pete Reilly for their own song “Rocks”.

The BandLab NME Awards 2022 return to the O2 Academy Brixton and are co-hosted by Daisy May Cooper and Lady Leshurr. The ongoing ceremony, which celebrates the brightest people in music and pop culture right now, has seen performances from Sam Fender, BERWYN, CHVRCHES and Robert Smith and Bring Me The Horizon.

Check back for the latest news, interviews, winners and more from the 2022 BandLab NME Awards.


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Bobby Gillespie Wins Best Music Book Award at BandLab NME Awards 2022 https://bitbooks.com/bobby-gillespie-wins-best-music-book-award-at-bandlab-nme-awards-2022-2/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://bitbooks.com/bobby-gillespie-wins-best-music-book-award-at-bandlab-nme-awards-2022-2/ Bobby Gillespie won Best Music Book at the 2022 BandLab NME Awards tonight (March 2) for child of the building. The Primal Scream frontman’s memoir beat Dave Grohl’s music books (The storyteller: tales of life and music), Michelle Zauner of Japanese Breakfast (Crying in H Mart), Quest love (music is history) and Paul McCartney (Words) […]]]>

Bobby Gillespie won Best Music Book at the 2022 BandLab NME Awards tonight (March 2) for child of the building.

The Primal Scream frontman’s memoir beat Dave Grohl’s music books (The storyteller: tales of life and music), Michelle Zauner of Japanese Breakfast (Crying in H Mart), Quest love (music is history) and Paul McCartney (Words) For victory.

“I am very happy and honored to receive the award for Best Music Book,” Bobby said. “Thank you NME! »

Posted on October 21 child of the building tells the story of Gillespie leading up to the creation of the classic Primal Scream album “Screamadelica”.

In 2007, Primal Scream was crowned Godlike Genius at the NME Awards. They also performed at the ceremony, joined by Mick Jones of The Clash to perform “(White Man) In Hammersmith Palais” and The View guitarist Pete Reilly for their own song “Rocks”.

The BandLab NME Awards 2022 return to the O2 Academy Brixton and are co-hosted by Daisy May Cooper and Lady Leshurr. The ongoing ceremony, which celebrates the brightest people in music and pop culture right now, has seen performances from Sam Fender, BERWYN, CHVRCHES and Robert Smith and Bring Me The Horizon.

Check back for the latest news, interviews, winners and more from the 2022 BandLab NME Awards.


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Music Book of the Month – “From the Staircase to the Stage: The Story of Raekwon and the Wu-Tang Clan” https://bitbooks.com/music-book-of-the-month-from-the-staircase-to-the-stage-the-story-of-raekwon-and-the-wu-tang-clan/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 11:34:31 +0000 https://bitbooks.com/music-book-of-the-month-from-the-staircase-to-the-stage-the-story-of-raekwon-and-the-wu-tang-clan/ “From Staircase to Stage” tells the gripping tale of famous word creator Corey Woods, aka Raekwon the Leader, and hip-hop heroes Wu-Tang Clan. Raekwon’s foray into the autobiographical format does not disappoint. Growing up on the stairs of Park Hill in Staten Island, Raekwon describes his turbulent upbringing and the iconic rap group’s legacy in […]]]>

“From Staircase to Stage” tells the gripping tale of famous word creator Corey Woods, aka Raekwon the Leader, and hip-hop heroes Wu-Tang Clan.

Raekwon’s foray into the autobiographical format does not disappoint. Growing up on the stairs of Park Hill in Staten Island, Raekwon describes his turbulent upbringing and the iconic rap group’s legacy in this fascinating memoir alongside Anthony Borza. Nothing is off limits: from the underground origins of the Wu-Tang Clan to the secrets of infamous songs and what it took to break into the mainstream.

Raekwon’s first solo album, Only built 4 Cuban Linx …, landed in 1995 to receive rave reviews and was instantly called a rap classic. It’s amazing to read the artist’s ideas from this chapter of the story, let alone his experience of becoming a father. The 320-page book also delves into her difficult childhood, with an absent father and a mother victim of domestic violence. His teenage years in the projects saw him witnessing guns, drug trafficking, criminal activity and gang killings. When the rapper escaped his rough life in the projects, he nonetheless stayed true to his Staten Island roots.

From the stairs to the stage Also includes Raekwon’s reminiscences of the fascinating rise to fame of the Wu Tang Clan, one of the most acclaimed and revolutionary hip-hop groups of all time. Overall a very compelling read.

Released now via Simon & Schuster.


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Music Book of the Month – “From the Stairs to the Stage: The Story of Raekwon and the Wu-Tang Clan” https://bitbooks.com/music-book-of-the-month-from-the-stairs-to-the-stage-the-story-of-raekwon-and-the-wu-tang-clan/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://bitbooks.com/music-book-of-the-month-from-the-stairs-to-the-stage-the-story-of-raekwon-and-the-wu-tang-clan/ “From Staircase to Stage” tells the gripping story of famed blacksmith Corey Woods, aka Raekwon the Chief, and hip-hop heroes Wu-Tang Clan. Raekwon’s foray into the autobiographical format does not disappoint. Growing up on the stairs of Park Hill in Staten Island, Raekwon describes his turbulent upbringing and the legacy of the iconic rap group […]]]>

“From Staircase to Stage” tells the gripping story of famed blacksmith Corey Woods, aka Raekwon the Chief, and hip-hop heroes Wu-Tang Clan.

Raekwon’s foray into the autobiographical format does not disappoint. Growing up on the stairs of Park Hill in Staten Island, Raekwon describes his turbulent upbringing and the legacy of the iconic rap group in this riveting memoir alongside Anthony Borza. Nothing is off limits: from the underground origins of the Wu-Tang Clan to the secrets of infamous tracks and what it took to break into the mainstream.

Raekwon’s first solo album, Only built 4 Cuban Linx…, landed rave reviews in 1995 and was immediately called a rap classic. It’s amazing to read the artist’s insights into this chapter of history, not to mention his experience of becoming a father. The 320-page book also delves into his difficult childhood, with an absent father and a mother who suffered domestic violence. His teenage years in the projects saw him witness guns, drug dealing, criminal activity and gang killings. When the rapper escaped his harsh life on the projects, he nonetheless stuck to his Staten Island roots.

From the stairs to the stage also includes Raekwon’s reminiscences of the fascinating rise to fame of the Wu Tang Clan, one of the most acclaimed and groundbreaking hip-hop groups of all time. All in all, a very compelling read.

Available now through Simon & Schuster.


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Best of 2021: Heavy Heavy Low Low singer chooses his favorite music, book and movie https://bitbooks.com/best-of-2021-heavy-heavy-low-low-singer-chooses-his-favorite-music-book-and-movie/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 15:10:57 +0000 https://bitbooks.com/best-of-2021-heavy-heavy-low-low-singer-chooses-his-favorite-music-book-and-movie/ Revolver has the eponymous first 7 inch Bone Cutter available for pre-order in limited edition “oxblood and black swirl” vinyl. Quantities are limited to 100 – grab yours now! 2021 has been, without a doubt, one of the most memorable years in the history of modern music. The invisible elephant in the room was obviously […]]]>

Revolver has the eponymous first 7 inch Bone Cutter available for pre-order in limited edition “oxblood and black swirl” vinyl. Quantities are limited to 100 – grab yours now!

2021 has been, without a doubt, one of the most memorable years in the history of modern music. The invisible elephant in the room was obviously COVID-19, which triggered the unprecedented year-long blackout on nearly every live show. Fortunately, this spring’s widespread immunization rollout proved effective enough that restrictions were lifted, and in the summer the groups were finally able to take to stages across the country.

While we’re not quite in the ‘post-COVID’ era yet, the sheer joy of experiencing the loud sounds and singular energy live from gatherings large and small – from sweaty concerts at the Turnstile club and from loud Slipknot road shows to major festivals run by Metallica – was beyond rejuvenation.

Plus, there have also been a bunch of killer albums released this year to keep us entertained between mosh pits. Old-school heavyweights Iron Maiden, Carcass and At the Gates brought the heat, stage directors Mastodon and Gojira upped the ante, Converge and Chelsea Wolfe unleashed a bombshell collaboration and a handful of pioneers in the making. – Spiritbox, Jinjer, Turnstile, Scowl, Portraital of Guilt and more – have taken heavy music to exciting new territories. (See Revolverthe 25 favorite albums of 2021 here.)

As we close the books on 2021, we’re catching up with some of our favorite artists to get their picks for the best of the best from last year. Below, Robbie Smith – the frontman of Bone Cutter and Heavy Heavy Low Low – shares his favorite shit: from ‘cool as hell’ driving tunes to body horror movies and beyond.

Max Richter Video – Flowers Of Herself (Official Music Video)

Best Song: “Flowers of Herself” by Max Richter

“Flowers of Herself” is a magnificent piece of music which seems to reveal itself and express its surprise at these discoveries. Both melancholy and urgent. Apparently it’s kind of a soundtrack from the first moments of [the 1925 novel] Mrs. Dalloway by Virginie Woolf.

Video of the TITANE trailer (2021)

Best Film: Titanium

Titanium is my favorite movie of the year. Titanium is both visceral body horror and a tender love story that says a lot about the fluidity of genres. It really is something! Pork is in a close second. I’ve seen 479 movies this year… so far.

Best Book: Billy Summers

I’ve read a lot this year, but I think the only book I’ve read that came out in 2021 is Billy summers by Stephen King. He is a hit man who engages in one last job knowing that things will turn sour like all “one last job” scenarios. The writing is impeccable. The novels that I liked and which did not come out in 21: Blind date by Jerzy Kosinski, In miso soup by Ryu Murakami, Hell by Catherine Davis.

Bone Cutter Video Live at Mathcore Index Fest 2021 (Live Session)

Best musical moment

The directing and performing of the Bone Cutter ensemble for the Mathcore Index Fest was creatively exhilarating. I’ve made music videos for up and coming bands and it’s incredibly satisfying for me while I wait to do some storytelling stuff.

What excites you the most in 2022?

Heavy Heavy Low Low is set to do the tour we postponed to 2020 and we’re pretty excited about it. I also hope to shoot my first feature film as a director!


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“Saved by a Song” by Mary Gauthier is a must-read music book for a lousy year https://bitbooks.com/saved-by-a-song-by-mary-gauthier-is-a-must-read-music-book-for-a-lousy-year/ Fri, 10 Dec 2021 16:33:14 +0000 https://bitbooks.com/saved-by-a-song-by-mary-gauthier-is-a-must-read-music-book-for-a-lousy-year/ MG_Nikon_011_B-copy-2 – Credit: Laura Partain * “Recovering, they have this saying, ‘You are only as sick as your secrets. And I have very few secrets. Marie Gauthier said. The songwriter is not dramatic. In songs like “I drink” and “Thank you now” she wrote and sang openly about her struggles with alcoholism and drug addiction. […]]]>

MG_Nikon_011_B-copy-2 – Credit: Laura Partain *

“Recovering, they have this saying, ‘You are only as sick as your secrets. And I have very few secrets. Marie Gauthier said. The songwriter is not dramatic. In songs like “I drink” and “Thank you now” she wrote and sang openly about her struggles with alcoholism and drug addiction. However, Gauthier was even more transparent in Saved by a song, a compelling memoir that delved into the details of the songwriting process and its own life story. Released earlier this year, it’s one of the must-see music books of 2021.

Gauthier writes about being thrown in jail for impaired driving, learning that she had been adopted, and embracing her identity as a gay woman. Corn Saved by a song is more concerned with what she describes at Rolling stone like the “magnificence of empathy”. It is a handbook of compassion.

More from Rolling Stone

“Music in its highest form is what it is. It is literally empathy, ”says Gauthier. “This experience of knowing what it is like to be someone else for a short while and knowing that you and that other person have a common bond of humanity that transcends anything we think about separates us: age, race, sexual preference, gender, language, religion and belief systems.

Gauthier, who had his songs recorded by artists from Boy George to Blake Shelton, was nominated for a Grammy in 2019 for his album Guns and rosary, a project that led her to help American veterans channel their emotions into songwriting. During the pandemic, she did the same with healthcare workers, giving them an outlet for the grief they experience on a daily basis.

We spoke to Gauthier about Saved by a song, the kind of writing that terrifies her, and what we can learn from soldiers.

Writing songs and writing a book can be deeply personal acts. What is most intimidating for you?
Ask someone who wrote [a book], it’s terrifying. Brandi carlile and I talked about it and because the main actors are all still alive, they’re going to want to vote on how you characterize them. And you can’t do that. You just have to write down your truth. Writing my own failures and my own struggles and my own recovery and in many ways redemption doesn’t scare me. I revealed everything in the songs. I’m 31 and I know when I tell my story it helps people. But what was terrifying [about the book] that’s when I brought in other people. I was nervous about some adoption stuff. My birth mom probably has no idea that I wrote a book or even read it if she did. I think she’s still alive. And my adoptive mother is still alive. I don’t want to cast a shadow over anyone and tell the story of others outside of school. Telling my own story is fine with me. Because, dammit, man, that’s the interesting part.

What about the act of writing a chapter versus a song?
I’ve learned that in writing books, just like writing songs, achieving simplicity is the hardest and steepest climb. Once you get simple it sounds like easy, but it’s not easy. Finding the stories that really tie everything together and squeeze my story into the bigger picture of why I think songs can be redeeming took forever. But it actually taught me something: that I used music and songs as a form of self-healing. Painters do it. Poets do it. The authors do. We don’t hear much about it in the song for some reason.

Are you saying we’ve lost some music as therapy?
And music as redemption. Music as healing. Music as empathy which is the great thing I got when trying to explain what I thought was going on with myself, then with the vets and now with the doctors and nurses in the units. Covid intensive care that I write with. It is the ability for us to step out of our own life and our own stories and get behind the eyes and in the skin of another person. This component of empathy is huge when you are dealing with trauma.

You write extensively on working with veterans. What can they teach us?
Everyone got involved for different reasons. But what I learned from the soldiers is that they are not there for political reasons. They are there to do a job and they are built for the service. And almost every veteran I’ve worked with is the kind of person in the line who would put everyone first. I don’t mean this in a way that will make them look bad, but that kind of selflessness is easy to harness. And I don’t know if that’s something they would ever say. There is good in those I have worked with and I just want to protect them.

Saved by a song really breaks down your writing process. You even include early drafts of songs to illustrate the development of a specific lyric. It was like a private lesson.
One of the most important things that I think the songwriting teacher can do is encourage people to be brave. I encourage my writers to go to scary places because that’s where the good things are. Get in the heat, find what really matters to you, and write about it. You don’t come to my house to learn to compose if you want to write pieces designed to attract a mass market and not offend anyone.

As a teacher, what I ask them is to say what they have to say. And that involves dealing with self-esteem issues. Who do I think I am? I mean, Bob Dylan is still alive! What am I doing? Why would it matter what I have to say? And my answer is that you are called to do this for reasons you can never know. And that’s part of the purpose of the book. You won’t know why you are doing this. You will not know why you are called. It is an act of faith.

The best of Rolling Stone


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Music Book of the Month: Dave Grohl – “The Storyteller” https://bitbooks.com/music-book-of-the-month-dave-grohl-the-storyteller/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 10:42:33 +0000 https://bitbooks.com/music-book-of-the-month-dave-grohl-the-storyteller/ Already recognized as the nicest guy in rock, he could also now compete with Damon Albarn as the first mathematician. Previously the subject of a beautiful biography of Kerrang! journalist Paul Brannigan, iconic Dave Grohl tells his life story in his own words in the captivating The narrator. Already one of the most famous drummers […]]]>

Already recognized as the nicest guy in rock, he could also now compete with Damon Albarn as the first mathematician.

Previously the subject of a beautiful biography of Kerrang! journalist Paul Brannigan, iconic Dave Grohl tells his life story in his own words in the captivating The narrator. Already one of the most famous drummers and singers in rock history, the musician could also have had a successful writing career, given the book’s impressive verve and style.

Written during the scorching days of lockdown last year, the narrative skips a bit, but the broad structure makes the author vividly remember his youth in suburban Virginia – in a memorable summary of the generation’s experience. X, Grohl describes his upbringing as “Stand By Me Meets River’s Edge” – before recalling the tragic rise and fall of Nirvana, and the eventual success of Foo Fighters in conquering the world.

It almost goes without saying that this is catnip for rock bios consumers, with the story made almost irresistible, thanks to rock royalty cameos such as David Bowie, Iggy Pop, Paul McCartney and more. . Elsewhere this year, Grohl took over the live with the Foos and made a documentary on the van tours, What motivates us.

Released now via Simon & Schuster.


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Jagmeet Singh ditched his music, book and food recommendations for a good day https://bitbooks.com/jagmeet-singh-ditched-his-music-book-and-food-recommendations-for-a-good-day/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://bitbooks.com/jagmeet-singh-ditched-his-music-book-and-food-recommendations-for-a-good-day/ From the Prime Minister as Clark Kent (yes, really) to Gurkiran Kaur Sidhu as Wonder Woman and Erin O’Toole’s dog as a lion, here are some of the most memorable Halloween costumes from Canadian politicians and of their families. Clark kent In 2017, the Prime Minister chose to dress as Clark Kent / Superman on […]]]>

From the Prime Minister as Clark Kent (yes, really) to Gurkiran Kaur Sidhu as Wonder Woman and Erin O’Toole’s dog as a lion, here are some of the most memorable Halloween costumes from Canadian politicians and of their families.

Clark kent

In 2017, the Prime Minister chose to dress as Clark Kent / Superman on October 31.

It’s certainly not the worst disguise Trudeau has ever done, but it’s not one of the best either.

On the bright side, her three kids look pretty cool, especially young Ella-Grace as Wonder Woman.

Obi-Wan Kenobi and Princess Leia

In 2020, Jagmeet Singh and his wife Gurkiran Kaur Sidhu were awarded their Star wars for Halloween, dressing up as Obi-Wan Kenobi and Princess Leia.

Both costumes are pretty impressive, and Kaur gets extra points for making a movie reference (albeit a common one) in Insta legend. Bonus points for the lightsaber too, Jagmeet!

The Mandalorian

Conservative Party Leader Erin O’Toole went all out for the occasion in 2021, dressing her entire family and even sharing a video on Instagram showing off their outfits and impressive decor.

While he opted for a costume inspired by The Mandolorian (with his own Baby Yoda), another member of his family dressed as M&M, while his dog transformed into a lion for the evening. Cute, eh?

Han Solo

Sci-fi films are a popular choice for politicians, it seems, as the Trudeau couple opted for a Star wars theme for their Halloween release in 2015.

The kids added a little flair like Elsa’s Frozen and a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle, but it’s clear JT was just looking for a slightly more comfortable costume that year!

Sherlock holmes

While it’s probably not a bad thing that Justin Trudeau played it safe with his most recent dress-up companies, Sophie Grégoire Trudeau clearly remembers that Halloween is for spooky outfits.

In 2018, the Prime Minister opted for a Sherlock Holmes-inspired costume, while Sophie did everything like a terrifying dead white witch. Oh, and his son disguised as an ax murderer (very cool!).

Captain Kirk


In 2017, then-Conservative Party leader Andrew Scheer also opted for a sci-fi themed outfit.

Channel Captain Kirk from Star trek, he joked on Twitter that “candy resistance is futile.”

It’s a classic Halloween daddy joke, but it’s a little bit funny.

The pilot and the little prince

In 2016, the Prime Minister disguised himself as a pilot of The little Prince, while her youngest son disguised himself as a little prince.

Her two other children returned to Halloween basics, wearing iconic costumes like the Joker from Batman and a witch. Classic!

halloween rowdies

In 2018, two MPs introduced the Scary Season to Parliament, disguising themselves as Statler and Waldorf from The Muppets.

The costumes are pretty good actually, and the setting makes this shot all the more perfect!



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